I KILLED SCHEHERAZADE BY JOUMANA HADDAD PDF

I Killed Scheherazade is a collection of essays, each leading off the previous one and touching on topics such as sexuality, exploration, erotic poetry, feelings of alienation, atheism and saying "To be a woman writer in an Arab country means to impose strict self-censorship, a thousand times harsher than any official censorship imposed from the outside" - Joumana Haddad, I Killed Scheherazade. I Killed Scheherazade is a collection of essays, each leading off the previous one and touching on topics such as sexuality, exploration, erotic poetry, feelings of alienation, atheism and saying no. It makes for an utterly fascinating read. She is challenging the status quo and is licking the wounds that as an Arab woman she has been dealt repeatedly throughout her life. Haddad speaks seven languages, including Arabic, English, French and Spanish, and has written books in many languages. She has also worked on several translations, including those of her own writing.

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I Killed Scheherazade is a collection of essays, each leading off the previous one and touching on topics such as sexuality, exploration, erotic poetry, feelings of alienation, atheism and saying "To be a woman writer in an Arab country means to impose strict self-censorship, a thousand times harsher than any official censorship imposed from the outside" - Joumana Haddad, I Killed Scheherazade.

I Killed Scheherazade is a collection of essays, each leading off the previous one and touching on topics such as sexuality, exploration, erotic poetry, feelings of alienation, atheism and saying no. It makes for an utterly fascinating read. She is challenging the status quo and is licking the wounds that as an Arab woman she has been dealt repeatedly throughout her life. Haddad speaks seven languages, including Arabic, English, French and Spanish, and has written books in many languages.

She has also worked on several translations, including those of her own writing. She was raised a Catholic but is now an atheist, and finds the main monotheistic religions equally to blame for creating a society where women are left without a voice. Just as she speaks out as an Arab woman, I reserve the right to do the same: I partly take offence for her vehement attacks against hijabs scarves.

It is entirely possible to be an educated, forward-thinking woman who freely chooses to wear the hijab. I may disagree with her on many things, but I definitely know how it feels to read to reach greener pastures. She is refreshingly well-read, and references many fantastic, underrated authors that often fall between the cracks.

Her appearance is often referenced in interviews speaking of bold make-up, miniskirts, and bright colours as if this decision makes her a stronger activist. Haddad also frequently has descriptions that are painful in how accurate they are. It means you cannot live and think what you really want to live and think honestly, spontaneously, and candidly. It means you are split in two, forbidden from speaking the blunt truth, because the Arab majority depends upon a web of comforting lies and illusions," she writes.

Arabs certainly find themselves worrying more about what is being said about them than actually walking boldly forward how they choose. This often means restricting yourself in ways that often have nothing to do with religion, but have become ingrained in our culture.

I like her stark honesty. I like a lot of her ideas. I Killed Scheherazade is an illuminating book, and certainly worth a read. So her name stroke me as revolution starting. I did not, however, expect the self-absorbed ranting around which the book mainly revolves. I say ranting for several reasons, most importantly because the book only complains about the obvious. Yes, we are a patriarchal society. Yes, women need to rise up. Yes, there When I picked up this book, I had expected an educated analysis of the women conditions in the Arab world.

Yes, there should be a revolution. But we knew these. We need new ideas, fresh ones to consider and that would be the foundation of a new era. The author seems to be justifying for the "Westerner" for his racism, and his prejudice.

By that she sets herself a victim of society, and that of The Other the Westerner. But wait, we do not start a revolution by playing victims! I say self-absorbed for several reasons as well. Far from "representing" the Arab Woman, Joumana seems to want to live and decide how life should be lived. The biographical part in her life aims mainly at exposing what a special, special girl she is, and that she has always been and known that she was different. Then, how she was opposed and hindered, yet she fought and slew or wants to slay the dragon.

All the while, stereotyping the Westerner freethinking, judge , Oriental man closed-minded, enemy , and most other women ignorant, victims. In addition to the redundancy of "I as an intellectual Arab woman". What is an intellectual? Who decides that you are one?

Other aspects about the book that I did not particularly enjoy include her arguments on femininity. She seems to emphasize that a woman should be a "woman" and man should be a "man" without any clear definition of what constitutes each. I found myself wondering, what about people who identify with being neither? That is completely respected. We all have the right to throw our feelings out there, hoping they touch others. Joumana did touch me and reminded of the Arab woman cause.

I thank her for that. Joumana now has a responsibility. She inadvertently took up the cause or by choice, so she should finish what she started, and we, women and men or neither, are with her.

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Shes been selected as one of the worlds most powerful Arab women in March by CEO magazine Middle East position 62 , for her cultural and social activism. She is head of the Cultural pages for "An Nahar" newspaper, and an instructor of creative writing at the Lebanese American University in Beirut. Shes also the editor-in-chief of Jasad magazine, a controversial Arabic magazine specialized in the literature and arts of the body. She has already published several essays and poetry collections, widely acclaimed by critics.

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Books by Joumana Haddad

John L. Haddad grew up during the Lebanese war that destroyed her hometown. She begins this brief account by recounting her childhood, when at 12 she opened Justine by the Marquis de Sade. Her skepticism as she came of age amid chaos soured her on the surety of any absolutes. Instead, she created erotic poetry. She wryly notes how the average Arab reads a quarter of a page a year, and how one-half of one percent of the Arab audience turns to verse for pleasurable fare.

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